Balance: Life, Work and Marketing

We are at the beginning of the summer months — school is out and it’s getting hot.  I’m finding the long days can be more productive; more time to work, more time to exercise, more time to swing in my hammock, more time to try and find balance.

The dictionary says balance is “a condition in which different elements are equal or in the correct proportions.”  I like that, “correct proportions.”  Perhaps achieving balance is a different combination of things and in different proportions as you move through the seasons.

At Work:  Summer can be a challenge. With staff members taking turns being on week-long vacations, that means there is a gap that other team members need to fill.  Is your team ready?  Are they cross-trained so that your level of customer service doesn’t miss a beat?  If coverage doesn’t go well, what can be learned and implemented before the holidays are upon us?

At Home:  Days are long, but also hot.  It’s a great time to shift your workout to the cool mornings before work, rather than planning a workout in 90+ degree heat after work. I recently installed a hammock between two trees in my front lawn.  Now, that’s where I head to de-stress when it’s hot outside.  Just the back and forth motion, swinging between two strong trees, balances me.

What does this have to do with a blog from a Marketing company?

What applies to personal life often applies to professional life. Summer is a great time to consider a new combination of activities to set you up for the rest of the year, such as:

Marketing Photos:  Summer is a perfect time to get new photography of your facilities, staff and service lines.  Everything is green and there are leaves on the trees.  Take this opportunity to be prepared with new custom photography that can be used all year.

Marketing Audit:  When was the last time you walked around the outside of your facility, or the inside for that matter; being totally aware of your customers’ experience?  How easy is it to find main signage, directional signage, posters, collateral materials, etc.?  Make a list of improvements that are needed, do what you can now, then add the rest to your budgeting wish list.

Marketing Planning: What season could be better for having lunch on the patio with staff or with customers to talk about the fall and beyond?  We are at the mid-year point — have you accomplished what you set out to accomplish so far, or do you need to pivot?

Large Marketing Project:  Sometimes the largest projects get bypassed in a normal day, as smaller pieces are easier to tackle along with daily interruptions.  The summer months could be a good time to tackle one of those larger projects.  Perhaps there is some quiet time with team members on vacation, or it’s your culture to take your laptop or notepad outside and away from distractions.  Tackle one big project—you’ll be glad you did.

Events:  Attend those events that you’ve been meaning to attend, if not for pure pleasure, as an opportunity to see how other marketers approach a special event. What new ideas might you be able to adopt?

Balance is in the eye of the beholder, for sure.  I don’t have kids at home any longer, so I’m pretty much in charge of my own day. I’m working on finding balance and not only enjoying this time of year but making sure I’m ready for the next six months of 2018.  I might even finish reading a novel in my hammock!

 

Jackie O'Hara, Boss Lady of Jet Marketing

Jackie O’Hara, Owner/Account Executive/Strategist

As the “boss lady” at Jet Marketing, Jackie is usually struggling to find time for herself. But when she does, there is nothing like a glass of wine and immersing herself in the latest copy of Darling.

 

 


5 Steps to Video Success

Video Success. You’ve heard the experts rave about video production, but how do you get started? What is the first step to creating your own engaging video and how can you share your video with the world?

If you’re not taking advantage of video and want to know where to start, here are five steps that will start you down the path to an effective video marketing campaign:

Step 1: Video Tactic

It is imperative to create a tactical plan for the video project.  What is it you are trying to accomplish? By having some sort of goal in place, this will allow you to measure the success of your campaign and help you form the main concept of your video. With a navigational plan in place, you will begin to execute your strategy.

The plan should be mindful of your:

  • Target market
  • Detailed strategy (what do you want your target audience to know, and what action do you want them to take?)
  • Distribution of the completed product
  • Budget and timeframe

Step 2: Assessment of Resources

Next, it is necessary to be aware of your restrictions and competencies. Ask yourself: Will you be creating these videos in-house or will you be hiring a firm? Do you have access to professional equipment and software or will you be improvising from your smartphone and iMovie? Whatever the case may be, knowing your equipment will help make the filming and editing process much easier.

Step 3: Script and Storyboard

In order to create your script, it is important to review your video tactic of your desires and ambitions. Once you know the type of video, you can begin your storyboard. A storyboard allows you to organize and visualize your scenes.

What should be integrated:

  • Key copy points
  • Visuals
  • Who can talk on camera, tell your story
  • Where will you shoot

Step 4: 

Production and Editing

Lights, camera, action! Make sure you have your equipment and team prepared for filming. Since you have developed your script and storyboard, everything should be smooth sailing from here.

A few helpful tips to save time during filming include:

  • Having your team prepared, they know the script well
  • Hold a pre-production meeting the day or hours prior to shooting
  • Identify any alternate locations due to unexpected weather or location challenges
  • Overshoot and don’t forget you can never have enough “B-Roll” (filler footage)
  • The storyboard guides your editing process 

Step 5: Uploading your video  

The final step is to share your video to social media or broadcast channels. There are a few different options with numerous benefits. You have the option of posting your video on your own website, YouTube, or Vimeo.

Let’s Fly Together

Jet Marketing can help you to navigate your way through video production. We will soar through the process by creating your personal flight pattern through the following:

  • Flight strategy
  • Research and development
  • Script and storyboard
  • Video production

Kathryn Kudra, Intern

On behalf of the Jet Marketing team, Kathryn would like to thank you for joining us on this Video Production trip. She looks forward to flying privately with you and your associates, and hopes you enjoyed this direct flight to success!


3 Marketing Strategies for Higher Education

With so many options when it comes to higher education, marketers need to get creative in attracting new students. While view books are still a hit with high school seniors and their parents who are exploring options, marketers in higher ed are embarking on more and more digital strategies to accommodate people of all ages who want quick answers and easy ways to navigate through options. Here are three options we offer our higher ed clients at Jet Marketing.

Get on Instagram

When it comes to providing quick information, social media is where it’s at and with the 35 and under crowd, Instagram is the place to be. Universities and colleges are jumping on Instagram to reach, attract and engage students. They use it to showcase their campus, highlight research and encourage student involvement—all the while providing calls to action with clever hashtags and incentives.

Several universities have Facebook pages for potential students where they post on exciting new programs and opportunities. The sky’s the limit when it comes to boosting enrollment through web, digital and social.

Boost class enrollment with email campaigns

When your college or university launches a new class, degree or program, it’s sometimes hard to get the word out. To boost enrollment, try an email campaign to students. An email marketing campaign involves sending a series of related emails within a set timeframe to current and potential students. They have grabby headlines, lots of graphics and infographics and an easy act now button for students to click on to instantly learn more.

Create a stunning view book or case statement that can also live on your website

College view books make an impact by telling student success stories, using infographics to highlight statistics, and relying heavily on large format pictures that pull the viewer in. Here at Jet, we are experts at making photos pop off the page and make an impact on readers. We are proud to have earned a Service Industry Advertising Award Best of Show on our Power Your Future campaign brochure for Gillette College Foundation.

Your view book can live on the web as a simple flip-able book, or crank it up by adding links to videos that go more in depth with student stories, research successes and faculty superstars.

Need more help? Get started with Jet – we’re experienced in creating digital and print marketing for colleges and universities. With clean design and a talented copywriter on staff, we can be as involved as you need us to be. To get started, reach out to Jackie today – we’re offering a discount on start-up costs for a limited time.


3Lynn Nichols, Content Director

Lynn understands the college search, having just gone through it with her youngest son, Evan. It’s tough having two kids in college at the same time!


5 Tips for Staying on Brand this Holiday Season

The holiday season is in full swing and you are most likely in the midst of hanging lights and drinking peppermint mochas, but is your brand holiday-ready? As tempting as it is to incorporate every reindeer and snowflake graphic that pops up on Pinterest, it’s important to still maintain your brand recognition. Here are a few guidelines that will help add some cheer while keeping your identity at the forefront:

Keep your logo intact and visible.

Now isn’t the time to replace your mark with a Christmas tree. Or to change your type to a scripty holiday font. Your logo should still be highly visible and unchanged. If you’re feeling really festive and want to incorporate your mark into a holiday theme in some way (i.e. your mark as a snowflake or an ornament on a tree), then go for it. But don’t forgo using your actual logo.

Keep your color palette.

Using all red and green when your colors are purple and gray isn’t going to make anyone recall your brand (unless you are a highly recognizable brand like Starbucks). If you want to add some holiday color, consider adding a luxurious, rich, warm accent color. Something that conjures feelings of warm fireplaces on snowy nights. Or going monochromatic, such as silver or gold, feels very elegant and merry, while being different but not too off-brand.

Tailor your messaging.

Tweaking your tagline or message is a good way to include the holiday spirit. Just make sure to keep it in the same voice as the rest of the year. If you typically have a serious and deliberate tone, now is not the time to be cutesy and humorous. And be sensitive to the fact that the holidays don’t mean “Christmas” for everyone. Keep your holiday marketing more general to the season so as not to alienate your audience.

Keep it fresh.

Consider updating your holiday approach each season. Using the same idea over and over each year can feel dated and tired. Take Starbucks for example. While they are known for their holiday cups, people eagerly await each year to see what the NEW design will be. If they were to parade out the same cup every year there definitely would not be the hype and anticipation that their holiday brand is now known for.

Don’t overdo the cheer.

It’s fun to get in the holiday spirit, but that doesn’t mean it should overtake your brand. Acknowledging the holidays and spreading some joy is absolutely acceptable but make sure that your brand doesn’t get buried in the eggnog and sleigh bells. Keep your message on point and make sure it’s still meeting your business objectives.

The goal is finding the connection between the joy of the season and your own brand. It’s a fleeting time of year that luckily, we get to do all over again next year!


ER headshot Erin Rogers, Creative Director at Jet Marketing

Erin is busy this holiday season trying to help her 3 year old resist the urge to cover every square inch of the house in holiday trinkets. Let’s not even talk about the outside decorations.


Brand Personality — Pumpkin-Spiced

 

Every year as summer begins to soften into fall, there are a couple of things I look forward to. The sweater weather, the changing leaves, football season and…Starbucks’ Pumpkin Spice latte.

Not only do I love the taste of it, I love the special voice that their marketing team gives the PSL on social media.

Everything from beer, to cereal, to chips and salsa can be pumpkin-flavored, and we can give the credit for pumpkin spiced passion to Starbucks. The PSL was first created in 2003, and has started a pumpkin spice boom every fall season since. From the beginning of September to the end of October (or Pumpkin Spice Season), @TheRealPSL is active on Twitter, Instagram, and Tumblr with cleverly curated posts. The PSL has been on social media since 2014. Aside from the Frappucino, The PSL is the only drink on Starbucks’ menu that has its own social media account.

Ultimately, the PSL social media is all about creating and sustaining hype for the drink. The PSL accounts are only active in the fall — first, to announce the imminent arrival of the PSL, and thereafter to remind people they can still get it.

As a major part of Starbucks’ sales, the PSL and its social media are essential.

So what makes the PSL social media strategy so effective? Four vital attributes–audience, scarcity, brand personality and creative content.

Audience

Starbucks knows their audience well. PSL customers tend to be somewhat affluent, health-conscious millennials. Reaching their audience effectively means that Starbucks has been able to gain a lot of followers (37k on Instagram, 17.4k on Twitter). Not only do they have a significant number of followers, the PSL generates significant engagement on their posts as well. PSL posts receive 493% more likes per photo than Starbucks’ regular posts.

By using a mixture of photos, videos, and GIFs, the PSL is able to diversify their social media feed and keep it interesting. And @TheRealPSL adds the bonus of responding personally to its followers.

Now you see where I got the good looks & bad eyesight. #FBF

A post shared by Pumpkin Spice Latte (@therealpsl) on

Scarcity

The PSL only comes around once a year for a short amount of time. Starbucks takes the cue of the changing leaves to start creating hype. By using clever, sporadic posts for the PSL social media, Starbucks drives excitement for the PSL and thus the purchase of the beverage.

Brand Personality

Unlike the other social media accounts for Starbucks, The PSL is very much a brand character or persona. The posts are put into PSL’s first person voice. The more PSL posts, the more the audience learns about the character. Even though it’s a product and it’s not around most of the year, the audience is invested in the PSL story, and they grow to love the PSL character. And because the brand has a well-defined, fun personality the content they produce is top-notch.

Creative Content

To go along with brand personality, the PSL social team has created posts that are eye-catching, entertaining, and fun. We learn the PSL goes backpacking, has a pumpkin-cat named Ginger, and other fun details. And the brand is responsive — engaging with fans that want to interact with the beverage on social.

For another example of a company using a branding character, check out New Belgium Brewing Company’s Voodoo Ranger. He’s a relatively new marketing tool for New Belgium, but he’s already the face of four of their beers.

Utilize the PSL social media strategy for your own marketing goals. But be sure to be original — we all know that the copycats aren’t the same as the real thing! Now, who’s thirsty for a PSL?


Kirsten Queen, Project Manager at Jet Marketing

Kirsten once dressed up as a PSL for Halloween and it’s still her favorite costume to date.


Protecting your Brand against the Unknown

Writing this blog was not on my “to-do” list until news of Hurricane Harvey. Current events spark conversation, so this seemed timely. It is not without sensitivity to those who have lost loved ones or who are dealing with loss of all unimaginable kinds.


The recent events in Houston invoke all types of emotions, by those directly and indirectly affected. For me, the current event was bone chilling because I spent the summer reading 5 Days at Memorial, by Pulitzer Prize author Sheri Fink.

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The book is a real-life account of the 5 days at Memorial Medical Center in New Orleans after Hurricane Katrina hit in 2005. The first half of the book paints the picture of a flooded basement that contained the emergency generator, a helipad that was in disrepair, a lack of electricity, plumbing, food and a lot of patients at various levels of health.

People died. Some on their own, some with the help of physician-directed medication. Healthcare professionals were saddled with a hopeless situation and delivered compassion in the form of dosages of lethal medication as they deemed necessary.

The second half of the book details the litigation that followed those difficult life-ending decisions. Everyone accused was eventually acquitted and the exercise prompted immunity laws that protect workers in an emergency situation today.

The epilogue was maybe the most powerful portion of the book. It reviewed not only disasters in third world countries when medical resources have to be rationed, but also situations like Hurricane Sandy and the Ebola patient at Texas Health in Dallas. It included discussion of ethics and the possible biases of having a limited resource distribution protocol in place. “Fifty patients, six outlets. How do you decide?” — was a quote from the book referring to a real-life situation when all fifty patients needed to be on ventilators.

A thought provoking read and history does, tragically, repeat itself.

What does this have to do with protecting your brand? Nobody can predict a natural disaster, but everyone can make an intentional effort to plan for the worst and practice their crisis plan. The lawyers in 5 Days at Memorial asked hospital executives for their crisis plan — a show of due diligence.

Your communications team needs to be part of the team crafting your crisis plan. Who will talk to the media? Where will press conferences be held? What is the message and talking points? Do you have press release templates and up-to-date media distribution lists?

What are smaller and more likely worst-case scenarios that might affect your business? Maybe it’s a theft, power outage, server failure or more snow than your employees can plow through.

Take some intentional time and brainstorm with your team. Make a list:

  • What could happen?
  • How would we respond to an event?
  • What can we do proactively now to minimize the effects of an event?
  • What is our chain of communication?
  • What/When/How do we inform our customers?

Read about other crisis situations, learn from their successes and failure. Remember Tylenol? Uber? Samsung? Wells Fargo? There are many examples of how the actions of others or actions of your internal staff can damage your brand.

My rule of thumb for a crisis response:

  1. Accept responsibility (not applicable in a natural disaster) — State what happened, clearly and honestly
  2. Apologize — We are very sorry for . . .
  3. Explain how it won’t happen again — new training, education or new processes in place — and set those changes in motion

Brands are an investment, and a good brand reputation can be quickly lost whether it’s the fault of something in your control or not. Nothing brings that home more profoundly than a tragic event. With Harvey on our minds, now is as good a time as any to be prepared.

Sending our prayers for those in Houston.


Swag Stats: Ten Things That Might Surprise You About Promotional Products

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Stylin’ in Jet shades

We all know that marketing has changed significantly over the last few decades. There are certain things that have remained consistently effective when it comes to brand recognition, swag items being one of them. People still like receiving promotional products and especially useful ones. Depending on distribution, it may be more effective to select something of higher cost that the user will value and keep longer, maybe an insulated tumbler. If the goal is to reach a broader audience, go with something less valuable but perhaps just as useful like a pen. Let these statistics* help guide your decision to get the best ROI for your business.

1. 85% of people remember the name of a company that has given them a promotional product

2. Consumers are 2.5x more likely to have a positive impression of promotional products compared to internet advertising.

3. 87% of consumers keep promotional products for over a year.

Here are some examples based on popular branded giveaway categories among US consumers:

4. 50% own a promotional writing instrument.

5. T-shirts are the most popular with consumers over the age of 55

6. 50% own a promotional bag. Among 18-24 year old women, 57% own one.

7. 53% own logoed drinkware, 50% of them use the item 2-3 times per week.

8. 45% own promotional USB Drives, and 91% keep them because they are useful.

9. 29% own branded calendars, and 76% of those consumers have them displayed in their home or office.

10. 50% of consumers own logoed outerwear and 75% of those keep them because they are useful.

Danielle
A Jet mason jar tumbler in action!

It is also important to consider the timing of a product — Think outside to box to gear your goods towards an event or the time of year. Is your audience going back to school? Think USB drives or cord wraps. Are they going to a football game? Maybe a clear tote bag. Do you want to engage your audience in social media posts? Give out something like trendy sunglasses to encourage fun photos. Regardless of the timing — go with a unique, useful and memorable item to make your brand stand out.

The right promotional product is out there for your business. There are endless options, and if you need help finding the perfect fit, we can help!

 

 

 

 

 

 

FullSizeRenderKatie proudly sports her Jet coffee mug almost everyday. She loves finding the perfect swag items for clients and then seeing them in action!


Every relationship needs an audit.

I recently got out my old bike. It’s a Schwinn, cruiser type, with an old basket and a cute bell.

 

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I expected it to perform like it had every other time I got it out of the garage. Without giving much thought to it, I assumed the tires were full of air, that the brakes would be functional and that the old bell on the handlebars would announce me as I cruised down the trail.

You know how this is going to end.

Without all the details: Tires . . . flat. Valve stem. . .cracked and leaking. Brakes . . . very little. Bell . . . well that was the only bright spot. These discovered defects were over two bike rides on two hot days – of course all my husband’s fault, so now he’s in trouble too.

Was it naïve of me to think that a bike I bought in 2000 for $99 would still be a trusted and reliable friend in 2017? I’ve never had it looked at by a professional. I have added some air to the tires . . . because heck, I don’t ride more than a few times a summer, what could go wrong?

These series of events got me thinking about how not only personal relationships need attention, tune-ups, some love and understanding, but also companies and businesses that use marketing tactics to drive business through the door, to educate, and to create top-of-mind awareness.

Like my bike, you can’t just buy it and let it sit. You can’t put up a website and wipe your hands and say it’s done. Social media and branding need constant attention. Decisions about marketing campaigns, updating the look of your company and even reinventing what it is you do and how you do it – happens over time as a result of constant listening, research and time spent contemplating “what if.”

I’ve been married 35 years. I still have to be reminded to make that extra effort, to be thoughtful, or to suggest a new restaurant.

It would be easier to (buy a bike, create a logo, sign the wedding license) once and be done. But like my bike — a painless audit at the beginning of my bike riding season would save a lot of back and forth to the bike shop, money and blame. I’m not a marriage counselor, but if you need a marketing audit, I can help you there – as long as I can fly or drive to visit with you about it.


The Magic of Good Summer Vacations and Great Vacation Marketing Campaigns

With warmer days upon us, my mind wanders to thoughts of summer vacation–the magic of warm evenings, the sense of freedom, and the adventures it promises to bring.

I recently read an article in the Chicago Tribune about a lesser known beach town in Rhode Island. The author ruminated on his decision to write the article, knowing that his words would attract people to his hidden gem. He wanted to hold that place close, preserve it, and have it be everything he always experienced each time he traveled there. In the end, he figured a few extra tourists wouldn’t spoil the spot he held so sacred. The way he described the feeling of the place, the food, the sunsets, the water, the outdoor showers (who doesn’t love a good outdoor shower after a sunny, sandy day at the beach!), the slow pace, and the sense of family, took me back to my summers as a child. We traveled to the northeast every summer to visit my grandparents who lived in Cape Cod, MA. Those summers fostered some of the best memories of my life. But what is it about those vacations? Is it the place? The experiences? The time with family? The pace? The innocence? Maybe it’s a combination of those things. A good vacation marketing campaign captures all of it.

Travel and vacation destinations are big business. When a marketing campaign does an amazing job at grasping and relaying the sense of time and place, it can stop you in your tracks. One really great campaign that stands out to me is Pure Michigan. The commercials are narrated by Tim Allen and are done in such a way that even the pace of the commercial relays the pace of the place, all in 30 seconds. It doesn’t feel rushed, and the imagery and narrative make you take notice.

Every time a travel commercial comes on the television I find myself stopping to watch, and longing for a vacation, maybe to Michigan! Pure Michigan is by no means a new campaign. It was launched in 2008, but it was so successful they also revamped their logo and website to match the theme, and it has had the legs to stay relevant into the present. It wasn’t simply a one-off summer campaign that was done once the leaves started to change colors!

A more recent campaign that really grabbed me, mostly for its humor, is the Las Vegas “What Happens Here, Stays Here” campaign. In one of the commercials a woman comes home from Vegas and tells her husband how much fun she had, pulling out her sketchbook to show him her “sketches” instead of photos of all that happened while there. It’s impactful because it’s so appropriate for what we think of Vegas. They never show a single image of Las Vegas. It was the feeling and reputation they captured. Maybe this campaign won’t quite have the staying power of Pure Michigan, but the wit and relevance sure do make it memorable.

 

 

Another campaign with a clever twist, is the new Sweden Airbnb campaign. In Sweden there is a national concept of “freedom to roam” meaning anyone has the right to access, walk, cycle, or camp on any land (with exceptions of private residences, and a few other restrictions). According to the site sweden.withairbnb.com. . . “it’s a home with all the necessities and amenities that any great home should have. It’s a place where you can eat berries from the ground, sleep under the stars, swim in the lakes and roam freely. To make this home available for everyone, Sweden has listed the entire country on Airbnb.” It’s a revolutionary idea for a country, and it’s causing quite a stir.

 

 

Vacation marketing must convey the magic of a place, and answer the question, “Why go there?” at a deep level for viewers. Marketing can’t create unique vacation experiences, but it sure can help you find the place to make those memories happen.

Maybe it’s the fast times we live in, always rushing from one demand to the next, always tuned in to technology, that makes us long for a slower time, where we can actually take a few breaths and feel the sun on our face and the sand beneath our feet. Vacations provide just that, a respite. So with summer just around the corner, remember to take a moment, or several moments, to pause and recharge. Better yet, take a vacation! Don’t let the days slip by. Grab your family and head to that special summer spot that lets you feel reconnected, and don’t forget to find an outside shower to rinse off your sandy toes.

ER headshot Erin Rogers, Creative Director at Jet Marketing

Erin is currently researching her next vacation destination and would love to hear all about your favorite spot!


Five reasons your brand isn’t working any more – and what to do about it.

Like everything in life, business is about relationships, and branding does a lot of the talking for you to your customers. Your brand communicates your values to your customers – are you trying to sell fun, quality, reliability, familiarity, innovation, or something else? Does your brand say that? If your branding isn’t communicating what you want it to, it’s time to think about rebranding. A rebrand isn’t a decision to take lightly — but it can make all the difference for a company, and take it to new levels.

Some reasons an organization might need to rebrand are:

A bad reputation — less than stellar customer service relationships may have tarnished your image. You’re ready to start over — with a new identity that’s more focused on your customers.

Name change, or a merger/acquisition — New blood in the family or a new direction prompts a conversation. Who are we? What do we do differently? How can we explain how the new organization is for the customer’s benefit?

Your brand no longer describes what you do — Along the way, your organization may have found a way to specialize or found new avenues of business. A rebrand helps solidify your place of relevance in today’s market.

Confusing — what is it you do again? If the customer has to ask this, they’ll probably use your competition instead.

You look like a competitor — You gotta stand out from the crowd.

Take rebranding as an opportunity to solidify colors, taglines, logos, and your look and feel to create a professional package that can be maintained across mediums. A brand isn’t just about the logos — it needs to be about your brand’s promise to customers too. A solid brand is a launch pad to fulfilling your customer’s expectations of you.

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A few of our clients have had different reasons for rebranding. For Campbell County Health, located in Gillette, Wyoming, they needed to figure out a name that showed that they were a health system, not just a hospital. With clinics, a hospital, and a variety of specialties and facilities, they needed a name and brand that encompassed the whole organization. By rebranding to Campbell County Health, they were able to designate themselves as a health system, not only a hospital. For their patients, Campbell County Health is now a more comprehensive health system that can provide excellent care for a variety of needs.

 

Another client, Prowers Medical Center, had had the same logo for almost 20 years. They had an outdated logo that didn’t speak to their real expertise. As one of the Top 100 Rural and Community Hospitals in the nation, Prowers Medical Center needed to look like it and present a united front. With a new brand, Prowers Medical Center extends the promise to their patients that they are contemporary and patient-centered. Branding & Strat_1

So — what kind of message are you trying to communicate to your customers, and is your brand doing that? If not — reach out to us. We’re great at helping you define your brand message. And from logos to materials, we’ll get you there.

Kirsten Queen, Project Manager at Jet Marketing

Among friends, family, and at the office, Kirsten is known as the cat lady – she’s starting to think it’s time for a personal rebrand!

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