The “always” in customer satisfaction

Being from Northern Colorado, I love the Human Bean coffee shop. Here’s why:

  • Their coffee drinks are consistently good
  • The staff is always friendly
  • They have drive-up service
  • I get a chocolate covered espresso bean on top, every time
  • They back up this goodness by donating generously to community causes

My Human Bean visits are a consistently positive experience. As marketers, we know that brand consistency builds brand loyalty. I’d add that brand sincerity does, too.

What do I mean by brand sincerity? They walk their talk. They don’t promise one thing and do another. They don’t fake a smile when they hand you your coffee to hide the stress they feel when cars are piling up behind you. They don’t give to various local causes simply to boost their marketing efforts. They don’t forget to make you feel special by placing that bonus bean on top.

Brand sincerity is a tricky thing, because you have to leave a positive impression every time you touch a customer, from the front door to the final transaction. The 17586583_1659281251047525_2502153972765163520_noutcome—that great cup of coffee—is most important, but customers decide who you are every step of the way. If you hit the mark each time, they’re yours to keep.

If you are in healthcare like many of our clients at Jet Marketing, you know consistency can be hard to achieve when a patient experiences 10 to 20 interactions in just one visit. Consider how many chances you have to be less than perfect: A patient sets an appointment, walks through the door, is greeted, sees a nurse or medical technician, sees a doctor, gets lab tests or imaging scans, gets a treatment plan, receives care instructions, checks out, receives a follow up call with results…and that’s all from one doctor visit. Imagine a hospital stay.

One grumpy interaction with staff or missed step along the way can result in a “usually” rather than an “always” on the HCAHPS patient satisfaction survey where healthcare customers rank their satisfaction on a scale of never, sometimes, usually and always. The only answer that generates full federal reimbursement from Medicaid and Medicare for hospitals and clinics is “always,” the most desired box to check on the survey—hence, hospitals thrive or nosedive by their Top Box results.

How can a hospital that has dozens of outlying clinics and a long list of services deliver top care consistently? How can they maintain brand sincerity when so many fingers are in the patient pie? Here are some ideas:

  1. Choose a motto and give it meaning with action.
    For example, our client Campbell County Health in Gillette, Wyoming chose “Excellence Every Day” which they’ve integrated into their daily team huddles and process improvement efforts.
    Provide scripting for front-end staff, technicians and nurses.
  2. Regardless of what facility your patients call, they get the same greeting and warm response. Some of our hospitals have employed the acronym AIDIT, which stands for Acknowledge (by looking in their eyes, calling them by name), Introduce (say your name and what you will be doing for them), Duration (if there is a wait, tell them how long), Explanation (explain the procedure) and Thank you (for choosing us, for calling).
  3. Enlist volunteers to greet your patients at the front door and offer to walk them to their destination.
    Our client Montrose Memorial Hospital did this with excellence on our first visit—complete with a charming older gentlemen who linked arms with us and walked us to the marketing director’s door.Always Blog graphic
  4. Educate patients they will be receiving a patient satisfaction survey and ask them to fill it out.
    While you can’t ask patients to respond with an “always,” you can let them know you want to hear their feedback, and that it helps you improve and makes a difference with federal funding. With that said, don’t let the HCAHPs survey be the end-all goal. Patients are savvy. They recognize when staff are insincerely nice just to get good scores. At the end of the day, an “always” is achieved by consistent, genuine and positive experiences that create loyal customers who are convinced you are great and expect nothing less. In other words, they trust you to deliver that delicious bean on top.

 

3Lynn Nichols, Copywriter, Publication Specialist

Around the office, our copywriter has earned the facetious nickname of “Dr. Lynn” for her off-the-cuff diagnoses of team ailments from her years of healthcare writing.


The Power of the Personal Story (and how to secure your own stories to highlight your brand)

I admit it – I’m a fan of The Voice and a few other mindless talent shows on television.  Sometimes I find myself choked up, all because of the heart wrenching stories told about the lives of the contestants.  Logically I know why they pick the most dramatic story lines – but emotionally, I’m hooked.

Turns out there is nothing like a good story.

A recent Forbes article titled The Power of Story explains, “. . .we are wired for interpersonal connections and put more stock in ideas that result from personal contact than from hard data.  Essentially, we internalize stories much better than we do facts.”*

In marketing, when others say good things about your products and services the message has much more credibility and longevity than mere description.  It takes work to procure real stories, but it’s worth it!

Always be Mining for Stories

Encourage friends, neighbors, family and staff members to share stories that reflect your organization or product in a good light. Remind them often, especially staff members. Follow up with unsolicited notes of thanks and social media posts to see if there is a lead and a willing storytelling participant.

Give People Something tScreen Shot 2016-08-01 at 9.44.50 AMo Talk About

Create a community event that encourages storytelling.  For one of our hospital clients, we created a community birthday party.  We invited all 10,000 babies that had been born in the community over the past 60+ years to come and be recognized. Lots of photos were taken, both pre- and post-event, and the community conversation about how the town has changed was robust.  It was a very positive image booster for the hospital and we shared photos in their community newsletter, social media outlets and print.

Another fantastic example is Heathrow Airport in London. They are using their 70th birthday to gather stories, encouraging anyone to share memories of time spent at the airport over those 70 years.  If you get a chance, it’s a GREAT read.

 www.heathrow.com/Stories

These types of campaigns encourage people to connect to a brand and to reflect on the ways that brand has impacted and influence their lives. By invoking nostalgia and encouraging people to reflect on their own memories connected to that brand, the outcome is positive feelings towards that brand.

Photos are Key!

We are all drawn to photos – especially ones with faces in them.  Professional or candid, make sure you have a photo to go along with the story.  Like they say, a picture is worth 1,000 words.

Be Transparent about Your Intentions

Don’t overplay or underplay what your intentions are.  If you have a story and a photo, be clear about the types of media you plan to use.  Don’t tell the storyteller it will only be a print ad and then later they see themselves on a billboard.  Keep the storyteller involved and make sure to give them the opportunity to approve materials.  Then stick to your word, otherwise the positive engagement could turn into a negative one.

I hear all the time that people don’t read anymore, and while I think that’s true to a certain extent, I do believe that we still like to read, hear and listen to a good human story.

The Power of the Story, published on Forbes.com

http://www.forbes.com/sites/gregsatell/2015/08/22/the-power-of-story/#77bdf25e5c95

 

Jackie O’Hara, Owner/Account Executive/Strategist

This summer, Jackie has enjoyed listening to friends tell stories around the campfire, working on home and yard remodeling projects, and sneaking in a few rounds of golf with her husband (the real storyteller of the family).

 


Organic Ways to Engage Your Customers via Instagram

Instagram Graphic 2

There is a lot of talk surrounding the changes that Instagram is making to their algorithms and advertising. We aren’t sure yet how those changes are going to affect how we use Instagram as a marketing tool, but for now, let’s get back to the basics of simply engaging your customers and perpetuating genuine interest in your brand.

The thing about Instagram that isn’t changing is that it is an opt-in marketing tool that isn’t perceived by users to be primarily marketing. Twice as many Instagram users regularly engage with brands than Facebook users. It is also one of the few social media platforms where it is possible to create awareness for free, for now.

Since 2012, Instagram has had a 115% increase in organic (without paid ads) marketing reach, while Facebook has had a 63% decrease. Instagram also has 58 times more engagement per follower than Facebook.

One last statistic – only 38% of marketers are using Instagram, while 93% use Facebook. So now is the time to jump on board.

1. Give them a reason.
Give your audience a reason to follow, like and share. There are a few ways to do this. To really generate activity – incentives are key. Prizes work wonders. It gives people a reason to follow your brand and share your posts.

As a user, having your post re-posted is like winning a gold medal. By reposting user photos, you are further engaging them and increasing brand loyalty as well as giving others reason to use your hashtag when posting.

2. Have relatable and creative content.
Humor and inspiration are two popular methods. Exceptionally beautiful or unique photos will generate shares as well. Users will tag their friends and will organically grow your following.

Have a consistent look when possible and of course use images that appeal to your audience. Find a way to make everyday content artsy – that is the fun part.

3. #hashtags.
Yes, they might be overused and somewhat obnoxious when there are 30 (this is the maximum) for one post. But they are important for being searchable and to drive engagement. Choose a unique hashtag to be your own that is as simple and as fitting as possible.

It is also important to use other relevant hashtags on your posts to make your post show up in searches – generating followers. Posts with 11 or more hashtags statistically get the most engagement.

4. Make the most of your posts.
Send your Instagram posts to your other social media platforms to get maximum engagement out of each photo. Be sure to post on the weekends – the most effective days to post are Friday, Saturday and Sunday.

Lastly, be sure to have a link in your bio section to drive your audience to your target content.

These are just the basics – the possibilities are certainly endless on Instagram. Get creative and take advantage of this free platform while it is still free.

Source for statistics: https://selfstartr.com/why-brands-should-embrace-instagram-instead-of-facebook/

Katie O’Hara, Project Manager at Jet Marketing

Katie loves Instagram because of the creativity and art it has added to social media. She also enjoys using it to grab her favorite moments and put them in pretty little squares. @kokatieo