Five reasons your brand isn’t working any more – and what to do about it.

Like everything in life, business is about relationships, and branding does a lot of the talking for you to your customers. Your brand communicates your values to your customers – are you trying to sell fun, quality, reliability, familiarity, innovation, or something else? Does your brand say that? If your branding isn’t communicating what you want it to, it’s time to think about rebranding. A rebrand isn’t a decision to take lightly – but it can make all the difference for a company, and take it to new levels.

Some reasons an organization might need to rebrand are:

A bad reputation – less than stellar customer service relationships may have tarnished your image. You’re ready to start over – with a new identity that’s more focused on your customers.

Name change, or a merger/acquisition – New blood in the family or a new direction prompts a conversation.  Who are we? What do we do differently? How can we explain how the new organization is for the customer’s benefit?

Your brand no longer describes what you do – Along the way, your organization may have found a way to specialize or found new avenues of business. A rebrand helps solidify your place of relevance in today’s market.

Confusing – what is it you do again? If the customer has to ask this, they’ll probably use your competition instead.

You look like a competitor – You gotta stand out from the crowd.

Take rebranding as an opportunity to solidify colors, taglines, logos, and your look and feel to create a professional package that can be maintained across mediums. A brand isn’t just about the logos – it needs to be about your brand’s promise to customers too. A solid brand is a launch pad to fulfilling your customer’s expectations of you.

Branding & Strat_3

A few of our clients have had different reasons for rebranding. For Campbell County Health, located in Gillette, Wyoming, they needed to figure out a name that showed that they were a health system, not just a hospital. With clinics, a hospital, and a variety of specialties and facilities, they needed a name and brand that encompassed the whole organization. By rebranding to Campbell County Health, they were able to designate themselves as a health system, not only a hospital. For their patients, Campbell County Health is now a more comprehensive health system that can provide excellent care for a variety of needs.

 

Another client, Prowers Medical Center, had had the same logo for almost 20 years. They had an outdated logo that didn’t speak to their real expertise. As one of the Top 100 Rural and Community Hospitals in the nation, Prowers Medical Center needed to look like it and present a united front.  With a new brand, Prowers Medical Center extends the promise to their patients that they are contemporary and patient-centered. Branding & Strat_1

So – what kind of message are you trying to communicate to your customers, and is your brand doing that? If not – reach out to us. We’re great at helping you define your brand message. And from logos to materials, we’ll get you there.

Kirsten Queen, Project Manager at Jet Marketing

Among friends, family, and at the office, Kirsten is known as the cat lady – she’s starting to think it’s time for a personal rebrand! 

😹

 


Change Happens in Life and Marketing

It seems like change has been in the air, especially with the whirlwind of our recent presidential election. For me, being the newest member of Jet Marketing, change has been at the forefront of my most recent days. Starting a new job is filled with a tremendous amount of change. Every day presents me with new information and knowledge to internalize, analyze and sift through. For some, the changes that come with starting a new career can be rather intimidating. There is no denying that change comes with a certain amount of discomforts; however, if you remain steadfast in your pursuit and open to change, your extra effort will be sure to pay off.

Just as in life, change in business happens too. Because of this fact, your marketing should too. By remaining open and accepting of change, a company has a better chance of staying current and finding new opportunities. With the ever-changing times (and the high frequency in changing consumer tastes), it’s not a bad idea to evaluate your marketing strategy on an annual basis. Through consistent analysis you can effectively make adjustments needed to remain current and find new opportunities otherwise overlooked. You may find that there is a brand new resource or avenue that can help you better reach your target customer and ward off competitors. Maybe there is a new social media tool or B2B product that can boost your appeal?

A change in marketing strategy can also help you increase your product’s natural life cycle and respond to any outside factors that may arise. In an article in the small business section of The Houston Chronicle, entitled, “Why Is There a Constant Need for Change in Marketing?” it was suggested that small companies should change their marketing strategies during different stages of the product life cycle. For example, in some cases a company may be forced to lower the price of a product in order to stay competitive as the market expands. On the flip side a need for marketing change may arise from fluctuations in law, technologies, or reductions in resources. One example being the scarcity of cork in the wine industry.  Many wine producers are moving to alternate materials, such as, plastic and twist lids in order to combat the reduction and higher prices of cork.

In life and business change happens. Because change comes with a certain amount of discomforts it is a natural impulse to want to avoid it; however, it is imperative to remain steadfast in your pursuit and open to change. In the big picture, all of the discomforts due to change are only temporary and your extra effort will be sure to be rewarding.

Jet Staff photo_JHJenn Holm, Account Manager

Jenn has never been one to avoid the discomforts of change. She enjoys adventures both big and small and really, sometimes, what better adventure is there than challenge?


Giving Back to Your Community is a Great Marketing Strategy

These days, it seems like everyone is participating in some kind of cause-based marketing campaign. Some pretty famous brands center on causes, like Livestrong and Product (RED). Box Tops for Education have long brightened our cereal boxes. Other brands like TOMS and Warby Parker have built a business around a cause. Even the NFL outfits their athletes in either pink or camo (depending on the month) for breast cancer awareness and their Salute to Service for veterans.

Cause-based marketing is a partnership between nonprofit and for-profit organizations for mutual benefit. It intends to bring awareness and fundraising to a good cause or nonprofit. This might sound like a lot of work, time, and money to spend on charity rather than on your own business, but there are a lot of good reasons why you might consider a cause-based marketing campaign. It’s an excellent way to build a reputation for your company and to create trust.

Your customers probably prefer a company that is associated with a cause. Almost a quarter of American shoppers usually buy one brand over another for this reason. Not only do customers care about causes, it’s also a lucrative field slated to continue growing. That’s a great big piece of market for you to get in on. And, despite the influx of cause-based campaigns, consumers remain very receptive to them.

Your employees also prefer to work for a company associated with a cause, especially one that relates to their community. It shows an investment from your company in your community – right where your employees live. People want their work to make a difference.

Cause-based marketing engages both your customers and employees, showing them that you care not only about them, but about the communities where they work and live. You’re not only doing good, you’re building a brand reputation.

So, how do you get involved in cause-based marketing? There are a couple things to consider, and it’s best to be strategic.

First, consider your company, your mission, your values, your audience. You want to be involved in a campaign that benefits you and the nonprofit or cause you partner with.

Any campaign you get involved in must feel true to your brand – consumers can see through gimmicks designed to pull their heartstrings and get their dollar. You want to keep and grow your customers’ trust. Don’t lose it by jumping aboard the cause-based train without careful thought.

Second, consider your range. Your company may be small and local, or vast and global.

For Jet Marketing, it makes sense for us to be involved locally.  We are involved with WomenGive, an organization that supports local single mothers with childcare scholarships as they go back to school. Our team members support WomenGive individually, but we participate as a team. As Jet is largely made up of women, this makes sense for us. It appeals to all of us working here, and we get to support our community by participating.

WomenGive
Jet hosted a table at the WomenGive luncheon, bringing together other women from our community to learn more about the program.

 

Far from just being trendy, cause-based marketing is a strategy that you can use to grow your brand and support your community. These type of campaigns promote your name, build trust around your brand, and motivate both your customers and employees. Making a difference in the world can also make the difference for your brand down the road.

Reach out to Jet whenever you’re ready to get started.

Sources: http://www.causemarketingforum.com/site/c.bkLUKcOTLkK4E/b.6448131/k.262B/Statistics_Every_Cause_Marketer_Should_Know.htmhttp://adage.com/article/agency-viewpoint/marketing-hot-pay-good/293537/
Kirsten Queen, Project Manager at Jet Marketing

Kirsten comes from a background in nonprofit work and is excited to learn more about the places where nonprofit work and marketing connect.


The Top 5 Reasons Training for a Half Marathon Made Me a Better Marketing Professional

We all have images in our heads of being a champion at something. For years I wanted to be a “runner.” I had these beautiful pictures in my head of what that would look like; tan skin, flowing hair, running like a gazelle through the mountains, or the crowd cheering wildly for me as I sprinted across the finish line to victory.  The problem is I am not a gazelle, and when I run, it looks more like that chubby neighborhood kid chasing down the ice cream truck, frantic and unsuccessful. Oh, and did I mention I also hate running?

Despite this strong dislike towards running, I started running casually as a commitment to a friend.  Since I am one of those people who like to jump in and overcommit right away, I proceeded to sign up for a half marathon.  Whoops! I immediately regretted this impulsive decision as I began to Google half marathon training programs.  I had thoughts like, “Who has time for this? How can I run and still have time to work?  What if I am not fast enough?  How could my legs possibly carry me that far?  Can I get a refund?  I hate running! ”  However, I still held on to that crazy mental image of me running across a finish line and I just couldn’t shake it.  I didn’t know it then, but I had been bitten by the running bug before I even took a step!

That’s how I came to write this blog on how training for half marathons has made me a better marketing professional.  Here’s what I learned:

1) Goal Setting Big and Small

The best way to get somewhere is to always know where you want to end up. Having a clear, definable goal with a deadline helps to keep you on track and stay focused when the path gets muddy.  Sign up for that race, schedule that client meeting!

It also helps to set lots of small goals that add up to a larger accomplishment.   When training or executing a marketing plan, I don’t look at the total number of tasks there are to complete in a project. Instead, I focus on the run- or tasks at hand- for that day and how they fit into my weekly schedule.  By focusing on these smaller more immediate tasks I am able to accomplish more without feeling overwhelmed. Achieving lots of small goals consistently over time always add up to a big win.
Where are you going?

2) Pick a Plan (and stick to it) 

Once you have a goal, you need to put a plan in place so you can be successful. Get a plan that maps out your routes every day so you get in the necessary miles and are ready on race day. Similarly, I love to write up a good marketing plan for a new project.  It helps get me motivated about the project ahead and sets up clear expectations for my team and myself.
What does your map look like?

3) Find your “people”

One of the ways to help keep you on a path to success is to have a support community in running and in business.  Find a mentor or go to coffee with a professional peer and bounce ideas off of each other. There are always people who have gone before us, so use their experience to give you an advantage.
Who are your people?

4) It’s Ok To Rest

Know when to take a break or walk! Believe it or not, your gut can tell you a lot more than just if you’re hungry.  Listen to your gut-if you need to step away from your desk or take a break, do it! When we are exhausted and frustrated we are more prone to getting injured or making mistakes. We do our best work when we feel energized and inspired.
How do you refuel?

5) Visualize crossing the finish line

I never lost the image of racing across the finish line and crowds cheering me on.  When training got tough or monotonous, I clung to that image. Why?  Because the goal was crystal clear to me. I knew what achieving that goal looked liked, sounded like and felt like. What does achieving that goal look like to you?  Can you visualize it?  Is it the perfect pitch to a new client?  Launching a new brand with great success?

Sometimes in the day to day of marketing we forget to visualize the finish line, we forget that we need support and the plan can go off track. When I run I have lots of time to think. I often reflect on the unexpected parallels between running and being a successful marketer. Training for a half marathon became one of the biggest opportunities for growth both, personally and professionally. I realized that I already had many of the necessary tools. I just needed to put them into action, literally one step at a time.

Lindsey Corcoran, Account Manager at Jet Marketing

During her free time, Lindsey enjoys long runs in the beautiful Colorado outdoors, followed by a good nap.